and

look, here’s the thing, I actually grew up where all the YA novels and tv shows are set, where everyone is white and middle class and has two college-educated and married parents (except That Friend, whose parents are divorced, or This Friend, who’s in the free lunch program)

so there was a fair bit of culture shock when I came—even to UChicago, which is nowhere near as diverse as the circles I find myself moving in now—but all I can do is find myself awestruck at all these people, all these modes of existence, because all my life I’ve been taught that you went down the checklist of middle class life, got your house and your kids and your college degree, the husband and job and the friends and I’m not saying that’s wrong? Because now I can see how immensely lucky such a life is, to have won something solid and true, and to keep that held together, to wake up every day and hope it stays.

except

there are so many ways to move through this world (I don’t think I realized, before I started meeting people who were doing it differently) there are so many surprises I haven’t discovered yet, there are secret pleasures and cheat codes and things hidden inside, and these people, in these places, with their stories and their determination and the fact that we all wake up and go about our lives in a single city where they’re shouting compliments down the fire escape of the building next to mine and it’s eleven o’clock and the city isn’t sleeping but it’s quiet, and the streets are dappled in the haze of electric lights, and in the Van Buren train station there’s a man playing something sad on a viola and I don’t know if there are words

Chicago

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

quantumblog:

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have?

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s curriculum for the first few years because calculus hadn’t been discovered yet.

Two empires [Roman & Ottoman] spanned the entire gap from Jesus to Babe Ruth.

When the pyramids were being built, there were still woolly mammoths.

The last use of the guillotine was in France the same year Star Wars came out.

Oxford University was over 300 years old when the Aztec Empire was founded.

Dola Dola
Ashanti - Bride And Prejudice Soundtrack

ancientart:

Bronze statuette of a veiled and masked dancer. Greek, 3rd–2nd century B.C.

The complex motion of this dancer is conveyed exclusively through the interaction of the body with several layers of dress.

Over an undergarment that falls in deep folds and trails heavily, the figure wears a lightweight mantle, drawn tautly over her head and body by the pressure applied to it by her right arm, left hand, and right leg. Its substance is conveyed by the alternation of the tubular folds pushing through from below and the freely curling softness of the fringe.The woman’s face is covered by the sheerest of veils, discernible at its edge below her hairline and at the cutouts for the eyes. Her extended right foot shows a laced slipper. This dancer has been convincingly identified as one of the professional entertainers, a combination of mime and dancer, for which the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria was famous in antiquity. (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections1972.118.95.


Stavropoleos Monastery, Bucharest, Romania

Stavropoleos Monastery, Bucharest, Romania

ashbless:

Costume from http://www.vertugadins.com

notbecauseofvictories:

look I’m just saying that Evita would be a hundred times better musical if you cast Che as a woman—a rangy, vicious, Cassius-like woman (lean and hungry, such men are dangerous) who stalks across the stage, encroaching on Eva’s space, looming over her, hovering at her elbow, circling her like a predator. A female Che that mocks and curses and sneers at every turn, but also follows Eva—intimately, painfully close, leaning on the headboard during Eva and Peron’s lovers’ talks, standing Cyrano-like beneath the balcony during Don’t Cry for Me Argentina. I’m just saying that there shouldn’t be any scene in which Eva is without the dark shadow of Che, and the few times the characters physically separate, the negative space between them becomes a statement in itself.

that’s all.

#because then it’s about Evita’s own internal voice     #her own frustrated desires and her own cynicism     #a depiction of one woman’s relationship to an ideal and how she can be haunted by its demands     #or maybe Eva’s awareness of her own inner demons     #the voice which tells her she is nothing but an actress shaming her for her promiscuity and her empty power     #and not…gross     #I live for a ‘Waltz for Eva and Che’ that’s them basically hurling each other across the floor; pulling each other closer     #a ”Goodnight and Thank You” that is about female Che (Eva’s Id? her Superego?) crowing about how ruthless she is     #I listened to this soundtrack on the train today I had a lot of feelings about it     #and why Che should be female 


"Will it fit her?"
"Like a pair of gloves."

"Will it fit her?"

"Like a pair of gloves."

The noblest battles are always fought in vain.

Karen Olivo could do it

look I’m just saying that Evita would be a hundred times better musical if you cast Che as a woman—a rangy, vicious, Cassius-like woman (lean and hungry, such men are dangerous) who stalks across the stage, encroaching on Eva’s space, looming over her, hovering at her elbow, circling her like a predator. A female Che that mocks and curses and sneers at every turn, but also follows Eva—intimately, painfully close, leaning on the headboard during Eva and Peron’s lovers’ talks, standing Cyrano-like beneath the balcony during Don’t Cry for Me Argentina. I’m just saying that there shouldn’t be any scene in which Eva is without the dark shadow of Che, and the few times the characters physically separate, the negative space between them becomes a statement in itself.

that’s all.

theartofanimation:

Simone Massoni - Cyrano De Bergerac

Last night I wore a shift of stars, buttoned
at the sleeve. I was following you, then
you were following me. There were a number

of appropriate responses, and I couldn’t
stop having them. The stars wheeled in me,
merging where the just-dusk grew botanical.

—Jennifer Militello, from “After Days Not Found,” Flinch of Song (Tupelo Press, 2009)

evilnol6:

.Gemma Arterton during the filming of “Gemma Bovery” directed by Anne Fontaine and based on the 1999 graphic novel by Posy Simmonds of the same name

theme